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Abstract Detail


Ecological interactions affecting the evolutionof plant mating systems: Current research and future directions

Golenberg, Edward M. [1], West, Nicholas [2].

Sexual Development and Hormones: Plants Respond, Too.

The generation of single sexed flowers in angiosperm is a complex topic, complicated by alternative definitions of sex determination,genetic vs. environmental sex determination systems, monoecy vs. dioecy vs.intermediate systems, and sexual plasticity. Much of this confusion stems from our desire to generate discontinuous categories and unified processes, when categories are continuous and processes are independent. Few sexual determination systems have been worked out in flowering plants, but of those in which the mechanisms are at least partially understood, plant hormones that are commonly used throughout plant development are often the trigger for differential sexual development. Many of these hormones are regulated in response to environmental cues. Additionally, many hormones interact in positive and negative feedback loops. The result is an emerging appreciation that genetic developmental cascades are often regulated by plant hormones that themselves may be modulated by internal and external cues. Thus, while the individual mechanisms vary, the processes by which species are monoecious, dioecious, or sexually plastic may be generally analogous.

Broader Impacts:


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1 - Wayne State University, Department of Biological Sciences, 5047 Gullen Mall, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, 48202, United States
2 - Wayne State University, Department of Biological Sciences, 5047 Gullen Mall, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA

Keywords:
floral development
plant mating systems.

Presentation Type: Symposium or Colloquium Presentation
Session: SY06
Location: Delaware D/Hyatt
Date: Tuesday, July 10th, 2012
Time: 1:50 PM
Number: SY06002
Abstract ID:452


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