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Abstract Detail


Ecological interactions affecting the evolutionof plant mating systems: Current research and future directions

Goodwillie, Carol [1].

The interacting evolutionary consequences of mating systems and hybridization.

The evolutionary implications of mating systems and hybridization are potentially interacting and complex. Self-fertilization is expected to contribute to reproductive isolation and therefore has implications for divergence of lineages and hybrid speciation. In turn, production of low fitness hybrids might select for traits that promote self-fertilization to confer prezygotic isolation, a form of reinforcement. Thus, hybridization could be a driving force in the evolution of selfing. Furthermore, introgression between selfing and outcrossing lineages could be an important source of variation in plant mating systems, and mating system variation is expected to affect the direction of gene flow between species. I will review literature on this topic and share results of my own related work on two systems. In a study of California annual species, hybridization between a predominantly selfing population of Leptosiphon jepsonii and a fully self-incompatible population of Leptosiphon androsaceus (Polemoniaceae) yields largely sterile hybrids. I show that L. jepsonii phenotypes with early self-fertilization are less likely to produce hybrid offspring and argue that hybridization may have selected for high selfing rates in this population. In a study of two subspecies of Triodanis (Campanulaceae), I examine the contribution of cleistogamy to reproductive isolation and provide evidence that divergence in allocation to cleistogamous and chasmogamous flowers produces asymmetry in hybridization.

Broader Impacts:


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1 - EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY, Department Of Biology, Mail Stop 551, GREENVILLE, NC, 27858, USA

Keywords:
hybridization
plant mating systems
reproductive isolation.

Presentation Type: Symposium or Colloquium Presentation
Session: SY06
Location: Delaware D/Hyatt
Date: Tuesday, July 10th, 2012
Time: 3:25 PM
Number: SY06007
Abstract ID:967


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